Presidential Elections: Past and Present

Updated: Dec 21, 2019

Editors of the Vanderbilt Historical Review and the Vanderbilt Political Review partnered for the inaugural Political History Podcast series. The three-part series is comprised of interviews with some of Vanderbilt’s leading scholars on elections, historical voting patterns, and socioeconomic changes in the United States.


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Part 1 of “Presidential Elections: Past and Present” is an interview with Dr. Jefferson Cowie. As the James G. Stahlman Professor of History, Dr. Cowie is a social and political historian who focuses on American politics and popular culture.http://vanderbilthistoricalreview.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Podcast-1-Cowie.mp3

9-10-08 - Photos of Sarah Igo, new faculty Associate Professor of History.(Vanderbilt University / Steve Green)

Part 2 of the podcast is another interview with Dr. Sarah Igo. She is an Associate Professor of History & Political Science. Her research analyzes presidential surveys and mass polling, both of which help to understand general American opinions.

http://vanderbilthistoricalreview.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Podcast-2-Igo.mp3

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Lastly, part 3 of the podcast is a continuation of the series on presidential elections with an emphasis on the historic precedence of controversial elections. Dr. Thomas A. Schwartz, a historian of US history, expounds upon the implications on foreign relations.http://vanderbilthistoricalreview.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Podcast-3-Schwartz.mp3


#Vanderbilthistory #presidents #politicalhistory #USelections #VanderbiltUniversity

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